Dating and relationship violence

The Centre for Promoting Alternatives to Violence describes abusers as being obsessively jealous and possessive, overly confident, having mood swings or a history of violence or temper, seeking to isolate their partner from family, friends and colleagues, and having a tendency to blame external stressors.Meanwhile, victims of relationship abuse share many traits as well, including: physical signs of injury, missing time at work or school, slipping performance at work or school, changes in mood or personality, increased use of drugs or alcohol, and increasing isolation from friends and family.

Perpetrators often attempt highly specific forms of abuse based on identity and community dynamics, including: Unfortunately, dating and domestic abuse is a problem on college campuses and often an indication of abuse in subsequent relationships and marriages.

There is a pervasive myth that a person who is in an abusive relationship doesn’t leave because they enjoy the abuse, or because the maltreatment takes the form of emotional abuse, which isn’t “real abuse.” These myths are false.

Emotional abuse not only impacts the victim’s self-esteem, it can cause long- term psychological trauma.

Relationship violence is a crime that is commonly misunderstood in our society.

You may have heard people say things like, “Why would she /he stay with him/her if they are abusing them ? ” These comments and questions can be hurtful and blaming of the person who is experiencing the violence.


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